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Thank You Email After a Meeting: What to Say, How to Say it

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Each day, there are thousands of unprofessional, misspelled, and lackluster emails that are sent out in the workplace. For many, email is one of the prime resources for office communication, especially when it comes to a thank you email after a meeting. So, needless to say, it’s wise to work on improving email composition. The best way to fix “shouldn’t have sent” emails is by preventing them in the first place. Below you will find a general template as well as a  guide down into three categories: thought, content, and time. 

 

Thank You Email After Meeting

 

Thank You Email After a Meeting Template:

Hi (team, all, department name, or individual names),

First, I would like to thank everyone for attending today’s meeting on (topic). Special thanks to (individual) for (presenting, preparing materials, etc.). As discussed, (reason for having the meeting- whether a problem, new initiative, or general review). In order to achieve our goal of (insert concrete goal), please consult the following next steps: 

–    (List next steps in clear list, organized by designated person/department on the task)

As a reminder, these assignments should be delivered to (titles or individual names) by (date). For those of you not in attendance, please contact (name) with any questions. The meeting’s (presentation, agenda, etc.) has also been attached to this email. 

Enjoy the rest of your day,

(Name or email signature)

 

Thought: Email Prep

  1. Stop and think – what is it that you are trying to say and what is it that you are NOT trying to say, do not confuse the two. Review your notes and any presentation materials. What are the key metrics or goals? What does everyone need to do next? Are there meeting minutes you can attach?

  2. Make sure everyone necessary is included on the email – you don’t want any meeting attendees to feel forgotten, unappreciated or purposely left out of an email, double check the recipients and compare it to any calendar invites.

  3. Use an appropriate email subject line – the biggest email fail is sending a message that goes unread. Make sure the email is labeled properly so recipients are sure to open it and not trash it.

 

Content: Email Composition

  1. Give credit where credit is due – if a particular person went above and beyond to put together this meeting or give a presentation, be sure to credit them in writing.

  2. Don’t go crazy with content – for the most part, everyone who will be reading this email has already attended the meeting. Avoid including every detail from the meeting and perhaps bullet the main points and future action items.

  3. Include contact information if the meeting requires further actions or communication, be sure to address who should be contacted regarding the matter. Ex: “For questions regarding the presentation, please contact Lynn from R&D.

 

Time: Email Proofing

  1. Check your spelling, then check your spelling again – the most unprofessional emails contain both spelling and grammatical errors, do not let a simple writing mistake be the only thing that recipients take from your email. If this email is going to C-level employees, don’t hesitate to ask a friendly co-worker to review it once before sending.

  2. Take your time – Do not rush the email, it will show in your writing. Be thoughtful of your sentence structure and phrasing.

  3. Send the email in a timely manner – the purpose of this thank you email is show gratitude and offer a quick review. If you wait a day or even a week to write the email, it’s wasted time. Attendees may have forgotten what topics were covered, let alone why you are thanking them in the first place!

 

 

Sending a hand written follow up thank you note? Here are some tips for other thank you letters for attending events.